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Computers & Society

Module 4 Description

Welcome to Computers & Society Module 4!

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

-First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

Again, this is Computers & Society, why are we talking about the First Amendment now?

Again, having a fundamental understanding of the U.S. Constitution and First Amendment is very important toward understanding how digital media and computer technologies are governed in the U.S. and other free countries around the world. In this module, we will examine the principles of freedom of speech and the regulatory structures that control media and changes brought about by digital media and computer technologies. We will consider free speech issues and how the U.S. Supreme Court has interpreted the constitutional principles and guidelines associated with the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

Class Readings

Please read the following for Module 4:

"Is your speech protected by the First Amendment?" by the First Amendment Center 

"Index of US Mainstream Media Ownership" by The Future of Media Project at Harvard University

"Net Neutrality Explained" from NYU Law News

"What Does Free Speech Mean Online?" from the ACLU Podcast, At Liberty.  You can either listen or read the transcript provided.