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Rowan Library Workshops

Rowan University Libraries offers workshops that are free and open to students, staff, faculty. and the public.

Rowan Library Workshops

Rowan Libraries Workshops

Register for current Rowan University Library workshops

During each fall and spring semester, Rowan University Libraries offers workshops on various topics related to inquiry, learning, research, and creativity. All workshops are free and open to students, staff, and faculty, and most are also open to the public.

This page lists all past and upcoming workshops. Please visit the Workshops calendar to view and register for upcoming workshops. If you are interested in a workshop that is listed on this page but not scheduled, please contact us to express your interest.

Slides for many past workshops are available on the Rowan Digital Works "Library Workshops" page.

Workshops are organized into the following categories (listed alphabetically): 

  • Citation Management
    Using reference management tools to create and organize citations and bibliographies and to integrate citations into academic writing
     
  • Creativity & Play
    Exploring topics outside the traditional realm of libraries, research, and scholarship
     
  • Digital Tools
    Using digital tools for various information needs, including finding, accessing, analyzing, and creating information
     
  • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
    Building understandings of systems of power and privilege and fostering cultural humility and more inclusive and equitable communities
     
  • Evaluating Information and Online Habits in the Digital Age
    Searching, navigating, and critically evaluating online sources, particularly in digital contexts
     
  • Scholarly Communication
    Exploring the creation, publication, dissemination, and discovery of research and scholarship
     
  • Teaching, Learning, and Inquiry
    Fostering student learning, particularly in relation to source-based research and inquiry

Online asynchronous training and professional development on technology and work-related skills is also available to the Rowan community through LinkedIn Learning. It can be accessed from the Libraries' Database Finder.

Workshop questions? Contact libraryworkshops@rowan.edu

Citation Management Software

Introduction to EndNote

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian 

Learning objectives: 

  • Attendees will learn how to import citations into Endnote.
  • Attendees will learn how to format a bibliography in Word using Endnote.

Endnote is a software tool for publishing and managing bibliographies, citations and references. Rowan University offers a free license to EndNote available to students, staff and faculty. This is an introductory workshop that will demonstrate how to import citations from various databases and search engines. In addition, formatting bibliographies in Word will be demonstrated.  

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Introduction to Mendeley Citation Manager

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives: 

  • Attendees will create content collections and organize their research
  • Attendees will learn to import research into their Mendeley account.
  • Attendees will learn to format their bibliographies in Microsoft Word.

Frustrated with organizing your research and typing out bibliographies by hand?  Do you have your PDFs stored in various places and wish they were all in one place and searchable?  Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian, will introduce Mendeley, an online bibliographic management software program that will help you organize your research and format bibliographies in just a few clicks.  Mendeley includes a social media component where researchers can connect with like minded researchers. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software Requirements: Word plug-in for Mendeley. Instructions will be sent prior to workshop

Introduction to RefWorks Citation Manager

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives: 

  • Attendees will create folders and organize their research.
  • Attendees will learn to import research into their RefWorks account using Save to RefWorks button and export functionality from various databases.
  • Attendees will learn to format their bibliographies in Word. 

Frustrated with organizing your research and typing out bibliographies by hand?  Do you have your PDFs stored in various places and wish they were all in one place and searchable?  
Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian, will introduce RefWorks, an online bibliographic management software program that will help you organize your research and format bibliographies in just a few clicks.  With over 3,000 bibliographic output styles and exceptional customer support, RefWorks will help any Rowan student, staff or faculty conducting research save time and get organized. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience. 

Software Requirements: None. 

Introduction to Zotero Citation Manager

Faculty: Andrea Baer, Public Services Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will import citations into Zotero manually and automatically.
  • Participants will incorporate Zotero into Microsoft Word and Google Docs and generate automatic citations and bibliographies.

Citation management software can help you keep track of the sources that you use in your research, but can also help streamline the writing and editing process. Come learn the tricks of open-source Zotero, and create citations and reference lists with ease, saving you valuable time.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: Recommended that participants download Zotero before attending the workshop: https://www.zotero.org/

Library Research for Engineering and Computer Science Theses and Dissertations

Faculty: Denise Brush, Engineering Librarian

This workshop is for engineering or computer science graduate students who are ready to start writing their master's thesis or doctoral dissertation, but do not know how to find and cite scholarly publications related to their research topic. This workshop will teach you how to find scholarly publications in engineering and computer science using library resources and tools, and how to properly cite published research, giving you the skills and confidence to successfully write your thesis or dissertation.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn how to find scholarly publications in engineering and computer science using library resources and tools (Library Search, Database Finder, LibKey).
  • Learn how to properly cite published research in your thesis or dissertation using APA or IEEE style.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Creativity & Play

Campus Tree Walking Tour 1: Giants Among Us

Faculty: Dr. Sara Wright from the Biological & Biomedical Sciences Department

Location: Meet in lobby of Campbell Library (weather permitting)

Learning objectives:

  • Learn about the trees on Rowan's Glassboro Campus
  • Get your steps in!

Skill levels for attendees: Novice, wear good walking shoes - we will go off path!
Software Requirements: None

Take a break, stretch your legs, and join Sara Wright from the Rowan Biological & Biomedical Sciences Department for an immersive 90-minute walking tour featuring Rowan's magnificent campus trees. Learn about local biodiversity, ecosystem services provided by our trees, and the native and invasive species that surround us.

Campus Trees Walking Tour 2: Autumn Leaves

Faculty: Dr. Sara Wright from the Biological & Biomedical Sciences Department

Location: Meet in lobby of Campbell Library (weather permitting)

Learning objectives:

  • Learn about the trees on Rowan's Glassboro Campus
  • Get your steps in!

Skill levels for attendees: Novice, wear good walking shoes - we will go off path!

Software Requirements: None

Take a break, stretch your legs, and join Sara Wright from the Rowan Biological & Biomedical Sciences Department for an immersive 90-minute walking tour featuring Rowan's magnificent campus trees. Learn about local biodiversity, ecosystem services provided by our trees, and the native and invasive species that surround us.

Photoshop Essentials

Faculty: Mike Benson, Digital Scholarship Specialist

Learning objectives: 

  • Gain a working knowledge of Photoshop

  • Learn the process of editing photos

In this in-person workshop, we will explore the amazing world of Adobe Photoshop. We will cover examples of what is possible, how to get access to this powerful program, and you will also gain valuable experience with the most utilized editing tools and techniques. In addition, we will explore editing principles, best practices, and professional tips of editing your photos for course projects and personal creativity. This will be a hands-on workshop and space is limited, so register early. No experience required in Photoshop or photography. Available to all students, faculty, and staff. This is a hands-on workshop within a combined Mac/PC environment. Space is limited so register early. Available to all Rowan students, faculty, and staff. Limited to 12 participants.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None (Photoshop available on lab computers)

Understanding Contemporary Art Practices

Location: Rowan University Art Gallery, 301 High Street

Faculty: Mary Salvante, Gallery & Exhibitions Program Director, Rowan University Art Gallery

Learning objectives:

  • Learn about Rowan University Art Gallery’s program of curated contemporary art exhibitions by professional artists. 

  • Learn how to partner with artists and the Gallery on educational programming.

  • Learn how contemporary art can be interpreted for use with a variety of curriculum.

The Rowan University Art Gallery serves as a resource for contemporary art for the Rowan community by cultivating an inclusive environment that encourages dialogue among artists, students, faculty, and the general public. Join Gallery Director and Curator Mary Salvante on a tour of the Gallery space at 301 High Street to experience the latest exhibition, while gaining an understanding of how public exhibitions come together through partnerships with nationally and internationally recognized professional artists. Each academic year, the Gallery presents four exhibitions covering a variety of interpretive themes, artistic materials, and creative techniques. This provides an opportunity for intersections with engineering, sociology, anthropology, history, education, environmental studies, social justice, performing arts, and women’s & gender studies, as well as the development of unique interdisciplinary collaborations through course projects, new research, community outreach, and other multidisciplinary practices. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Walking Tour: The Public Art Collection at Rowan

Location: James Hall, South side main lobby (by the “Glassboro Kaleidoscope")

Faculty: Mary Salvante, Gallery & Exhibitions Program Director, Rowan University Art Gallery

Learning objectives: 

  • Learn about Rowan University’s public art collection.

  • Learn about the multidisciplinary process of preparing for, selecting, installing, and maintaining public art.

  • Learn about how our public art collection can be interpreted for use with a variety of curriculum.

Join Rowan University Art Gallery Director and Curator Mary Salvante on a walking tour of Rowan’s public art collection. Beyond its aesthetic significance, public art fulfills Rowan’s mission to provide diverse educational experiences by stimulating conversation and encouraging awareness of place. The pieces - sculptures, paintings, and monuments - represent our cultural legacy, serve to convey Rowan’s values and identity, encourage creative and critical thinking, expand appreciation for art, and extend the scholarly and creative culture beyond the classroom. Public art is studied by a diverse group of scholars, including art historians, architects, engineers, historians, geographers, and social scientists. In education, public art can be integrated into the curriculum to inspire creative and critical thinking, teach history and culture, develop awareness and appreciation for art, and explore the human condition. The Rowan public art collection explores themes in the humanities, biology, engineering, geography, literature, mathematics and science, medicine, philosophy, and even University history, making it ideal for inspiring new research, course projects, outreach, and creative development.

Both tours will begin at the central point of James Hall’s south side main lobby (by the “Glassboro Kaleidoscope") (address: 445 North Campus Drive, Glassboro, NJ 08028). The fall semester tour will cover the west side of campus, while the spring semester tour will cover the east side of campus.

Please note that the tour is an hour+ of moving across campus. Seating is limited or unavailable at the tour stops. Construction on campus may change the tour route. The tours are wheelchair accessible. In the case of inclement weather, the tour will be canceled.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Digital Tools

Conducting Systematic Reviews in the Health Sciences

Faculty: Amanda Adams, Reference & Instruction Librarian and Ben Saracco, Research & Digital Services Librarian at Cooper Medical of Rowan University 

Learning objectives:

  • Conduct systematic reviews in health sciences.

This workshop will instruct participants on the steps involved and the planning process for systematic reviews, including faculty, librarian, and student roles. Systematic reviews identify, appraise, and synthesize all available evidence on a specific research question. A protocol is used to determine what will be included, and follow specific standards to reduce bias. Health sciences faculty may be interested including psychology, nursing, sports medicine, and other disciplines. The goal is to encourage more systematic review studies and collaboration with students and librarians.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Create Accessible and Searchable Acrobat PDFs for Research and Learning

Faculty: Mike Benson, Digital Scholarship Specialist

Learning objectives: 

  • Attendees will understand how to convert a scanned PDF to searchable text.

  • Attendees will understand how to make PDFs more accessible for those using screen readers.

In this in-person workshop, attendees will learn how to quickly convert scanned PDF documents to searchable text, which can help increase research speed and learning. Rowan instructors will learn how to make their course PDFs searchable and accessible. We will also share tips and resources for making PDF files and presentations more ADA accessible. Topics discussed will include searchable PDFs, accessibility, scanning documents, using a mobile device to create PDFs, converting to OCR, alt tags, and reducing file sizes of large PDFs. Please note that this is not a hands-on workshop. The presenter will demo the process and also share resources. Limited to 15 participants.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience 

Software requirements: None (Acrobat Adobe DC available on lab computers)

Create Transcriptions of Course Videos and Presentations for Increased Learning

Faculty: Mike Benson, Digital Scholarship Specialist

Learning objectives:

  • Attendees will understand why it is essential to create transcriptions of audio and video shared within a course.

  • Attendees will understand how to quickly create a transcription of audio, video, or live presentations. 

  • Attendees will gain hands-on experience creating, editing, downloading, and sharing a transcription. 

In this workshop, attendees will learn how to quickly create transcriptions of course audio, videos, and presentations for student learning and accessibility. We will demonstrate how to create a transcription of a video and a live conversation using a free plan of an online service. We will also demonstrate how to edit and download a transcription, which can be shared in email or uploaded to Canvas. We will also explore the features of a paid account, including a media player that allows the user to share audio and text in an interactive format. Limited to 20 participants.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience 

Software requirements: None (Workshop is a demonstration and does not involve hands-on practice) 

Digital Humanities: Text Analysis with Voyant Tools

Faculty: Tim Dewysockie, Library Application Support Specialist

Learning objectives:

  • Learn to prepare and upload text for analysis in Voyant Tools. 

  • Learn fundamental text analysis concepts through instruction and hands-on practice with Voyant’s suite of tools.

Voyant Tools is a web-based, open-source platform for text analysis, or the computational analysis of text. Text analysis has a wide range of applications, but in humanities research–such as in literary studies and historical research–it can be used to explore research questions in novel ways through “distant reading”. Unlike close reading, or the human interpretation of small amounts of text, distant reading utilizes computers to identify patterns and trends in large amounts of text. For example, text analysis can be used to determine which words appear most frequently in texts (word frequency analysis), show how terms are used in different contexts (keywords in context), identify topics (topic modeling), and much more. Text analysis is one methodology in the field of digital humanities that augments traditional humanities scholarship by providing interpretive tools to work with text on a large scale, in ways that would otherwise be too labor-intensive. This session will cover how to prepare and upload text into Voyant for analysis, explore fundamental text analysis concepts through Voyant’s built-in tools, and prompt reflection on the potential benefits–as well as the pitfalls–of using digital humanities methodologies and tools to explore humanities research questions.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience 

Software requirements: None

Eyes in the Sky: An Introduction to Remote Sensing

Link to slides
Faculty: Dr. Ashley York, Department of Geography, Planning and Sustainability 

Learning objectives: 

  • Understand basic definitions and common applications of remote sensing technology
  • Know how to acquire freely available remotely sensed imagery
  • Learn how remotely sensed data can be used to visualize different land covers on Earth’s surface in a GIS

Remote sensing is defined as the acquisition of information about an object or phenomenon without making physical contact with the object. This means that the human eye taking in visible light reflected by objects is technically remote sensing! But the science of remote sensing is generally based on the scanning of the Earth by satellite or aircraft in order to obtain information, usually electromagnetic radiation, about the surface. For example, certain waves of radiation (specifically, microwaves) can be used to distinguish between clouds, sea ice and ocean water. Or, the relationship between certain waves of light (red and infrared) can inform on the health of plants. Essentially, remote sensing uses the electromagnetic spectrum to distinguish between, and measure changing conditions of, different land covers on Earth. In this workshop, participants will learn the basics of remote sensing science and technology, common applications of remote sensing, how to acquire remotely sensed imagery and use spectral information to highlight properties of different land covers on Earth’s surface in a Geographic Information System.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Finding Historical Primary Sources

Faculty: Andrea Baer, History and Political Science Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Identify Internet and library resources for locating primary sources.

  • Identify and apply effective search strategies for locating primary sources.

Locating primary sources for historical research can be both exciting and challenging. There is no central location for all primary source material, and it’s not always easy to determine what search terms will lead you to the content you want. In this hands-on workshop, participants will learn about good starting points for locating primary sources (both on the web and through the library) and will develop effective strategies for locating primary sources. This workshop includes time for hands-on practice and questions.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Introduction to LinkedIn Learning

Faculty: Mike Benson, Digital Scholarship Specialist

Learning Objectives: 

  • How to Access the LinkedIn Learning Platform
  • How LinkedIn Learning can increase your learning and completion of your projects
  • We will explore the interface, settings, and saving courses.
  • We will explore a course, including downloading exercise files.
  • Explore how videos can be integrated into course topics
  • Learn about certificates and badges

This workshop will explore LinkedIn Learning, an online video training library with thousands of expert-created courses on various topics such as creativity, design, business, programming, software, and technology. You can learn to edit photos, design a brochure, code a website, start a business, and even learn to develop a mobile app. You can learn what you need when you need it. You can take a course or watch a single video. The system also provides certificates and badges when you complete a course.

LinkedIn Learning is free to current Rowan University students, faculty, or staff members through the Rowan University Libraries.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience 

Software requirements: None

Introduction to Literature Mapping Tools

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Learn what is literature mapping
  • Explore various literature mapping tools
  • Learn new approaches to finding research beyond traditional databases

Literature mapping is a method for discovering and exploring connections among scholarly peer-reviewed articles on your research topic. It uses graphical methods to plot relationships among published scholarship (e.g., links via citations, authors, keywords, other descriptors). Literature mapping can help researchers see patterns that otherwise might not be evident. In this introductory workshop, Life Sciences Librarian Dan Kipnis, will present various   s literature mapping techniques and online tools (i.e. Elicit, Semantic Scholar, and Litmaps) to help researchers discover scholarly literature beyond using traditional databases.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

LibKey Nomad: Simplify Access to Library Content

Faculty: Jon Jiras, Technology Services Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Install and set up LibKey Nomad on your own web browser.
  • Understand how LibKey Nomad works and how it simplifies access to library content. 

LibKey Nomad is a free browser extension provided by Rowan University Libraries that makes accessing electronic journal articles easier. It links you to open access and licensed library content and allows you to avoid publisher paywalls when on publisher websites, search engines, and Wikipedia.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Library 101

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will navigate the library website to discover various services that the library and librarians offer.
  • Participants will strategically search and filter for resources using Library Search.
  • Participants will be able to access library resources through Library Search, databases, link resolvers, and interlibrary loan.

This workshop is designed as an introduction or refresher to Rowan University library services, particularly new faculty and transfer students. Topics covered will include using Library Search, online resources, research guides, and interlibrary loan. There will also be time reserved for questions and answers on general library services.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Library Research for Engineering and Computer Science Theses and Dissertations

Faculty: Denise Brush, Engineering Librarian

This workshop is for engineering or computer science graduate students who are ready to start writing their master's thesis or doctoral dissertation, but do not know how to find and cite scholarly publications related to their research topic. This workshop will teach you how to find scholarly publications in engineering and computer science using library resources and tools, and how to properly cite published research, giving you the skills and confidence to successfully write your thesis or dissertation.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn how to find scholarly publications in engineering and computer science using library resources and tools (Library Search, Database Finder, LibKey).
  • Learn how to properly cite published research in your thesis or dissertation using APA or IEEE style.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Making Meaningful Maps in a Geographic Information System

Link to presentation

Faculty: Dr. Ashley York, Lecturer, Department of Geography, Planning, and Sustainability

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the basic steps of gathering, organizing, and analyzing spatial data in a GIS software program.
  • Know the elements necessary and how to make a meaningful map product.
  • Use ArcGIS Pro Software.

Many of us use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in our everyday lives without even knowing it. The last time you used Google maps to get to a desired destination, you used GIS. Google is using spatial information about distance, speed limits, and traffic, in order to perform calculations that, ultimately, direct you to your destination along the fastest path. In general, GIS is a framework for gathering, organizing, and analyzing spatial data. By arranging spatial information into coincident layers, GIS software can help reveal deeper insights into patterns and relationships – not only where occurrences and processes of interest are happening, but also why. By visualizing data through maps, GIS users can make smarter decisions. In this introductory workshop, participants will learn the basic steps for gathering, organizing, and analyzing spatial data that are necessary to create a meaningful final map product using the ArcGIS Pro software program.

Note: This is a 75 minute workshop!

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Organizing Archival Photographs & Documents with Tropy

Former Faculty: Bret McCandless, Performing Arts Librarian

Learning objectives: 

  • Participants will be able to organize and label archival photographs and documents effectively.
  • Participants will enhance the searchability of archival photographs and documents through description.

This workshop will introduce participants to Tropy, an open-source software designed for academic researchers in the humanities that manages archival photographs and documents. Tropy helps researchers keep track of essential information such as the library, collection, folder, and page number for hundreds or thousands of photographs of archival documents, essential for documentation and publication. Come learn strategies for organization, searching, note-taking and metadata entry that will help you sift through intensive archival research. It is recommended that prior to attending, participants should download Tropy and may bring their own photographs for hands-on activities: https://tropy.org/

Skill levels for attendees: Some experience with archival research suggested

Software requirements: None

Preserving Personal Digital Information During An Era of Extreme Weather

Former Faculty: Rachel King, Online Services and Scholarly Communications Librarian, CMSRU

Learning objectives:

  • Learn best practices for effectively storing and organizing documents in a variety of file formats.
  • Understand how climate change and increasing energy costs impact the preservation of digital information.

If you've ever had a corrupted computer file, a damaged smartphone, or a stolen laptop, you know how easy it is to lose important digital data. What’s more, extreme weather will increase the likelihood of data loss in coming years. At the end of this one-hour virtual workshop, you'll have the skills you need to be your own digital archivist during an era of extreme weather. Through a combination of lecture and hands-on exercises, we'll cover tips for naming files, choosing file formats, and storing data for long-term access.At the end of the workshop, participants will feel confident in their ability to preserve their personal and professional digital data, and they will understand the challenges passing personal archives, including treasured photographs and videos, along to future generations.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Research Resources for Departing Rowan Students & Alumni

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Learn about Open Access resources for research

  • Discover add-on tools for accessing research

  • Learn what resources and services are available for Rowan alumni

Will I still have access to this database when I leave Rowan? This is a very common question that is asked by many Rowan students, staff and faculty. When Rowanites leave the institution many of the library databases (over 300 of them!) that are available for research from Rowan University Library system are unavailable. This workshop will highlight resources and services available to Rowan graduates and the Rowan community to help them with their research needs as they leave the University and transition to their next destination. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience 

Software requirements: None

Search Google Scholar Like a Pro

Link to slides

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives: 

  • Attendees will set-up preferences in searching Google Scholar
  • Attendees will learn advanced search tips for creating focused search strategies in Google Scholar

Google Scholar has rapidly become a starting point for research. Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian, will introduce search tips and tricks for searching Google Scholar. Rather than getting millions of results, learn techniques to focus your searches. In 30 minutes attendees will become power searchers and learn the tricks the expert searchers use to improve their results. The last 15 minutes will be dedicated to questions and practice. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software Requirements:  None

Your Program Is Online, So Where’s Your Library?

Link to slides

Faculty: Ashley Lierman, Instruction & Education Librarian

Learning objectives: 

  • Identify key resources and services available from the Rowan University Libraries for online graduate and professional students.

  • Describe first steps for accessing library services as an online student

If you’re in an online graduate or professional program at Rowan, eventually you’ll need access to books, scholarly and professional articles, tools to make citing sources faster and easier, or just a friendly face to help you find information. If you’re an online student, though, you might not know how to find those things. It might have been a long time since you were a student before, and you might be intimidated by how much has changed. You might be new to graduate school, online learning, higher education in general, or the United States, and have extra questions about navigating information. Or, if you’re neurodivergent or disabled, you might be hoping there are library tools that can meet your specific research and writing needs.

If so, this workshop is for you! You’ll meet virtually with a librarian who specializes in online and graduate education, who will walk you through the services and resources the Libraries offer online students, and how to get started. You’ll also have the opportunity to help set the agenda with your own specific interests and questions. All are welcome, whether you’re at the beginning of your program or near the end: it’s never too late to learn something new!

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience, Lots of experience

Software requirements: None

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Design Thinking for DEI and Social Justice Projects

Faculty: Ash Lierman, Education Librarian 

Learning objectives:

  • Define design thinking.
  • Articulate the value of a design thinking approach to DEI and social justice work in higher education.
  • Use a design thinking process to develop their own pilot DEI and/or social justice project.

Are you a Rowan employee who wants to make a difference for marginalized Rowan community members, but doesn’t know where to begin? This two-part workshop is intended to help you move from passion to progress, using a design thinking approach. In the first 60-minute session, we’ll introduce what design thinking is, how it helps, and how it applies to DEI and social justice work in higher education. We’ll then begin our own design thinking process, where each attendee will brainstorm and select an equity or inclusivity issue that you want to address in your work, then clearly define the problem, and plan how to find out more. Between the sessions, attendees will go out and gather real feedback from the community, and bring it back for the second session, where we’ll brainstorm ideas for projects to respond to the issues. At the end, each attendee will leave ready to prototype or pilot their project, and start making a change for our community. All Rowan staff and faculty from all campuses are welcome. Student workers, adjuncts, graduate student instructors, and all others are very much included!

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Diversifying Digital Representation: Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

Organizers: 

  • Tim Dewysockie and Andrea Baer, Rowan University Libraries
  • Jason Luther, Writing Arts
  • Jessica Mack, History

Rowan University Libraries is partnering with History and Writing Arts faculty to host a Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on digital representation, including in history and in alternative media. Our mission is to fill gaps in Wikipedia's coverage of people, groups, or issues that are culturally or historically relevant but currently underrepresented. The event theme is intentionally broad, in order to accommodate for a diversity of topics and interests.

This event will focus mainly on hands-on Wikipedia editing. Participants who are new to Wikipedia are encouraged to view the presentation recording from Rowan’s March 2023 Women’s History Month, which provides an introduction to Wikipedia Edit-a-thons and editing. During the live event, there will be a shorter introduction to Wikipedia editing. Librarians and faculty will also be available in person and virtually to answer questions. Participants can also continue editing online throughout the month of October.

There are numerous ways to contribute to Wikipedia, including adding citations to a select article, making small or substantial edits to an article, or even creating a new article on an overlooked topic, issue, event, or person. The event organizers have created this Wikipedia Dashboard, which will include some article suggestions, organized by topic. 

No experience is necessary. Stay as long as you like during the live session, or participate virtually during or after the live event!

Wikipedia can be edited in guest mode or using an account you create. If you plan on creating a Wikipedia account (which is required for advanced features like creating new Wikipedia pages), create it in advance.

Inclusive Citation Practices

Faculty: Andrea Baer, Public Services Librarian

Learning Objectives: 

  • Reflect on the value of seeking a diversity of perspectives and voices when researching a topic, as well as barriers to locating a diversity of voices and perspectives in scholarly conversations.
  • Identify ways that citations influence conversations about a given topic, including what perspectives and voices are included or excluded.
  • Identify and apply strategies for diversifying the perspectives and voices reflected in your citations.

Research and scholarship are sometimes described as conversations: people with varying kinds of knowledge and expertise on a topic and different perspectives on it ideally come together to share and further strengthen their individual and shared understandings. But having open and inclusive conversations is often tricky. Who is present in the conversation, who is absent, and how are people’s voices heard, muted, or amplified? How do people enter into the conversation, and what barriers stand in the way?

These questions point to the reality that scholarly conversations, like all conversations, are greatly influenced by the social structures and systems in which individuals and groups exist and interact, and which often advantage some while disadvantaging others. Inclusive citation practices, through which individuals seek out and engage with sources that reflect a diversity of voices and perspectives on a topic, can help to create more inclusive academic research and conversations. Participants in this workshop will explore the value of inclusive citation, as well as develop practical skills for inclusive citation.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Unpacking Algorithmic Bias

Faculty: Andrea Baer, History and Political Science Librarian

Learning Objectives: 

  • Identify scenarios in which algorithmic bias may influence search results in a given online environment.

People often think of technology and search engines like Google as neutral and unbiased. But search engine algorithms frequently reflect larger societal biases, as search engines “learn” from things like: the online content that they index, the topics for which people search, the search terms people use, and the links people click on. Google and other search engines also rank search results based partly on ad revenue, rather than prioritizing source relevance or credibility. Looking beyond Internet search engines, algorithms make predictions about us that can have real consequences on our everyday lives (for example, how much someone pays for insurance, whether someone gets a bank loan, or even if a person’s job application makes it to the eyes of those doing the hiring). Often this further exacerbates social inequities.  

There are a good number of people and groups who are working actively to minimize and counteract the negative effects of bias in search systems and to build more ethical and human technology. But this work has a long road ahead. One thing that everyday citizens can do immediately is to increase our algorithmic awareness and to develop search and evaluation strategies that work to counteract the negative effects of algorithmic biases. 

Challenging the notion that technology and algorithms are neutral, the workshop explores how algorithms influence both online search and everyday life. Participants are invited to consider how algorithms affect their online and offline experiences, to become familiar with where “algorithmic bias” might show up, and to strengthen their abilities to minimize its negative effects, starting with increased algorithmic awareness. 

Related Research Guide

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Evaluating Information & Online Habits in the Digital Age

"Debunking" Misinformation: Challenges and Strategies

Faculty: Andrea Baer, Public Services Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Recognize the challenges of “debunking” misinformation. 
  • Recognize the role that confirmation bias plays in how people look for and respond to information that reinforces or challenges their views. 
  • Identify and apply effective strategies for “debunking” misinformation. 

The spread of misinformation has always been a problem, but the Internet, social media, and other digital technologies have intensified the speed and ease at which misinformation spreads. The often reactive nature of our brains and of our personal biases also play a role, especially given increased political polarization in the U.S. and beyond. Once misinformation has spread, correcting it isn’t as simple as merely telling people that information is inaccurate. People tend to continue believing the false information despite the correction. This is especially true when the misinformation reinforces a person's pre-existing beliefs. 

But there are useful ways to counter misinformation! In this workshop you’ll be introduced to effective “debunking” strategies and on related research on the relationship between our brains, beliefs, and the spread of misinformation. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Digital Wellness: A Workshop for Rowan Faculty

Faculty: Andrea Baer, Public Services Librarian

Learning objectives: 

  • Reflect on the ways that digital technologies positively and negatively affect your well being.
  • Explore examples in which digital wellness plays a role for individuals and for society as a whole.
  • Identify your own digital wellness priorities and related actions you can take to better support your digital wellness. 

Over the past several years, almost all of us have become highly reliant on digital technologies and platforms to complete everyday tasks and to meet many of our most basic social, emotional, intellectual, and physical needs. At the same time that digital technologies help us connect with others and to engage in meaningful activities, digital platforms can also be sources of stress that divide our attention, negatively affect our physical health, and pose privacy concerns. 

In this interactive workshop, we will reflect on the positive and negative effects that our relationships to digital technologies have on us as individuals and as communities. We will consider recent research on this topic, as well as everyday examples of people's relationships to technology and digital wellness. Throughout the session, we will consider our digital wellness priorities and related actions we can take to better support digital wellness in our own lives and in our communities. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: Computer recommended but not required

Evaluating Expertise

Faculty: Andrea Baer, Public Services Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Explore approaches to evaluating the expertise and trustworthiness of information sources, particularly when evaluating online sources.
  • Develop and apply strategies and guiding questions for evaluating expertise and source reliability.

When you come across information on social media or in a news article, a website, or even a scholarly journal, you might sometimes wonder whether you can trust the information you see. Among the key questions you might ask is whether the person making a claim or an argument has the appropriate level of expertise or the right motivations. In some cases, it’s pretty easy to determine who is really behind a source and whether you can trust them and what they say about themselves and about an issue. In other cases, a person might look credible on the surface, but with a little digging you learn that they are not what they first appeared to be. Evaluating expertise is particularly important when evaluating information found on social media or in unfamiliar sources and when evaluating claims about contested issues.

In this workshop, participants will explore approaches to evaluating the expertise and trustworthiness of information sources, particularly when evaluating online sources. The workshop will include discussion, reflection, and hands-on activities through which attendees develop and apply strategies and guiding questions for evaluating expertise and source reliability.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, some experience

Software requirements: None

Evaluating Online Sources: An Introduction to "Lateral Reading"

Faculty: Andrea Baer, Public Services Librarian & Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Attendees will be introduced to lateral reading strategies for source evaluation, including SIFT and click restraint.
  • Attendees will evaluate sources using SIFT and the click restraint. 

Critical evaluation of online sources has become a necessary and required skill in academia, as well as in everyday use of the internet.  With the explosion of fake news, pseudoscience, and deep fake videos, how can researchers determine if a source is legitimate? While in some cases it’s fairly obvious that a source is suspect, at other times this isn’t so straightforward. Recent research indicates that both university professors and college students have difficulty recognizing misleading online sources that at first glance look reputable. The close reading skills that are key to academic work differ from the evaluation strategies needed when quickly determining whether an online source is trustworthy enough to be worth a closer look.  

In this 1-hour workshop, librarians Andrea Baer and Dan Kipnis will introduce “lateral reading” strategies that involve quickly moving off of a webpage and learning more about a source from other online information. This workshop is informed by the work of Mike Caulfield and of the Stanford History Education Group. (For a quick overview of these strategies see libguides.rowan.edu/EvaluatingOnlineSources.)  

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Unpacking Algorithmic Bias & Promoting Algorithmic Awareness

Faculty: Andrea Baer, Public Services Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Identify scenarios in which algorithmic bias influences search results in a given online environment.

  • Identify scenarios in which algorithmic bias influences everyday life choices or decisions. 

  • Identify and apply simple strategies for recognizing and counteracting the negative effects of algorithmic bias.

People often think of technology and search engines like Google as neutral and unbiased. But search engine algorithms frequently reflect larger societal biases, as search engines “learn” from things like: the online content that they index, the topics for which people search, the search terms people use, and the links people click on. Google and other search engines also rank search results based partly on ad revenue, rather than prioritizing source relevance or credibility. Looking beyond Internet search engines, algorithms make predictions about us that can have real consequences on our everyday lives (for example, how much someone pays for insurance, whether someone gets a bank loan, or even if a person’s job application makes it to the eyes of those doing the hiring). Often this further exacerbates social inequities.  

There are a good number of people and groups who are working actively to minimize and counteract the negative effects of bias in search systems and to build more ethical and human technology. But this work has a long road ahead. One thing that everyday citizens can do immediately is to increase our algorithmic awareness and to develop search and evaluation strategies that work to counteract the negative effects of algorithmic biases. 

Challenging the notion that technology and algorithms are neutral, the workshop explores how algorithms influence both online search and everyday life. Participants are invited to consider how algorithms affect their online and offline experiences, to become familiar with where “algorithmic bias” might show up, and to strengthen their abilities to minimize its negative effects, starting with increased algorithmic awareness. 

Related Research Guide

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Using Wikipedia Wisely

Faculty: Andrea Baer, Public Services Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Identify advantages and limitations of Wikipedia as an information source. 
  • Become familiar with the values, principles, and practices to which the Wikipedia Foundation aspires and the processes it uses to support them. 
  • Identify and apply effective strategies for evaluating the credibility of individual Wikipedia articles.

Have you ever been told not to use Wikipedia because anyone can edit it and it therefore isn’t a reliable source? Do you use Wikipedia, whether with or without reservation? How should you understand Wikipedia’s role amidst a sea of information, when the Internet provides access to such a wide range of information sources that vary greatly in quality and credibility?

In this interactive workshop, participants will learn about the values, principles, and practices to which the Wikipedia Foundation aspires and will consider the advantages and the limitations of Wikipedia as an information source. Building on this foundational knowledge, participants will develop strategies for effectively evaluating the credibility of individual Wikipedia articles and will consider how to use Wikipedia wisely for their own research and information needs.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Women's History Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Hybrid Kick-Off

Link to presentation

Organizers: Tim Dewysockie and Andrea Baer

Registration required

This coming March, Rowan University Libraries is partnering with Women’s and Gender Studies to host a Wikipedia Edit-a-thon for Women’s History Month. Our mission is to fill gaps in Wikipedia's coverage of Women's History.

We’ll have a 2-hour kick-off meeting in early March. In the first hour, the facilitators will introduce the basics of Wikipedia editing. The live presentation will be recorded and will followed by an hour of hands-on editing. During that time the facilitators will also be available to help. Participants can also continue editing online throughout the month of March, and the facilitators will continue be available throughout the month to help.

After learning the basics during the first hour of the live kick-off meeting, you will have the tools you need to help combat Wikipedia's gender imbalance. There are numerous ways to contribute to Wikipedia, including adding citations to a select article, making small or substantial edits to an article, or even creating a new article on an overlooked topic, issue, event, or person.

No experience is necessary. Stay as long as you like during the live session, or participate virtually during or after the live event!

Wikipedia can be edited in guest mode or using an account you create. If you plan on creating a Wikipedia account (which is required for advanced features like creating new Wikipedia pages), create it in advance.

Scholarly Communication

Affordable Textbook Alternatives

Link to slides

Faculty: Sam Kennedy, Information Literacy Librarian, Ashley Lierman, Instruction & Education Librarian, and Allison Novak, Public Relations Professor. 

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will be able to articulate the value of replacing course textbooks with alternatives that are affordable for students.
  • Participants will be able to select methods and strategies for changing course materials to affordable alternatives.
  • Participants will be able to use library and open web resources to help them find and implement pre-made affordable materials.

Educational costs are more of a challenge than ever in our current remote learning situation, where used textbooks are more difficult to acquire and other economic circumstances may be creating difficulties for students. This workshop will assist teaching faculty who want to alleviate their students' burdens by replacing costly course textbooks with high-quality alternatives that are free or low-cost to students. We will discuss the benefits of using affordable and accessible materials even beyond saving students money, and bust some common myths about alternatives to traditional textbooks. We will also provide practical strategies for multiple methods of implementing alternatives, with realistic estimations of the time and effort required for each, and demonstrate how to find and evaluate pre-existing materials using library resources and on the open web. Please join us to learn how you can help your students be less stressed and more engaged with your teaching, as soon as next semester!

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Assessing Credibility of Open Access Journals for Scholarly Publishing

Link to slides

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Learn the importance of open access publishing.
  • Learn some strategies for identifying (top) journals for publication.
  • Learn about what to look for in identifying and avoiding predatory publishers.
  • Be introduced to resources to help with evaluating open access journals.

Scholarly publishing is an important part of a faculty member’s academic and scholarly life cycle. With the rise of digital publishing, however, it is important to have the tools and awareness to identify quality journals to publish in. In this workshop, attendees will learn what to look for in identifying and avoiding predatory publishers and will be introduced to resources to help with evaluating open access journals. The workshop includes a hands-on activity where attendees will evaluate an online journal for its quality and credibility by applying criteria learned during the workshop and using some tools that the Rowan University Libraries licenses.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Best Practices for Writing Effective Data Management Plans (DMPs)

Link to slides

Faculty: Ben Saracco, Reference and Research Librarian, Cooper Medical of Rowan University

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about different components of digital management plans (DMPs).

  • Learn about resources available at Rowan to assist with writing better DMPs and infrastructure that may be available to meet funder requirements.

  • Learn how to better manage the research lifecycle.

External funding agencies are increasingly requiring researchers to write effective Data Management Plans (DMPs) as part of their grant proposals. DMPs include information on how researchers plan to manage, store and preserve research data to meet funding agency requirements for their grant award. This workshop will guide researchers about the different components of a DMP, best practices for writing effective DMPs and introduce tools and resources available to Rowan researchers for the same. This guidance will help researchers be more effective with managing their research lifecycle and also meet external funding agency data retention and public access requirements. This workshop is open to Rowan faculty, students, and staff.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Build Your Researcher Profile with ORCID

Link to presentation

Faculty: Ben Saracco, Reference and Research Librarian, Rowan University and Denise Brush, Engineering Librarian, Rowan University. 

Learning objectives: 

  • Attendees will learn about ORCID.
  • Attendees will learn about benefits of having an ORCID to researchers.
  • Attendees will gain understanding of how ORCIDs fit into the research workflow.

ORCIDs (Open Researcher and Contributor IDentifiers) are useful to all who participate in research, scholarship, and innovation. An ORCID helps to uniquely identify and connect researchers to their contributions and affiliations across time, disciplines, and borders. In this workshop, attendees will learn more about ORCIDs, their benefits and their significance in the research workflow. There will also be time during the workshop to create ORCIDs if an attendee does not have one. This workshop is open to Rowan faculty, students and staff.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Copyright 101

Link to slides

Former Faculty: Rachel King, Online Services and Scholarly Communications Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will understand the basics of copyright considerations and their role in higher education.
  • Participants will understand the role the library plays in managing copyright concerns for access to copyrighted materials.
  • Participants will understand the basics of Fair Use and its application in using licensed or copyrighted materials/e-resources for teaching, learning, and scholarship.

This workshop will introduce participants to the basics of copyright. The focus will be on understanding the basics of copyright for creators and users. We will explore the role of the library in managing use of print materials and licensed electronic resources. The workshop will also briefly introduce participants to key issues related to fair use for teaching, learning and scholarship. A deeper dive will be available in the Fair Use and Instruction workshop. It is intended for informational purposes only and is not legal advice. This workshop is intended for faculty and graduate students. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Copyright and the Creative Arts

Former Faculty: Bret McCandless, Music and Performing Arts Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will understand the basics of copyright considerations for creative arts such as music, theater, dance, film, and visual art.
  • Participants will understand the basic role that licensing plays in performing and distributing creative work

Copyright is particularly complicated in the creative arts, and creators should want to know what their rights are, the limitations of those rights, and the possibilities and limitations of incorporating copyrighted works in their creative processes. Copyright and licensing have been major news in the past year, from Taylor Swift’s masters to the rise of NFTs. Even Rowan Theatre’s 2021 production of Plum Bum required copyright knowledge to be staged. This workshop will only scratch the surface of some of these complex issues, but will include information on copyright, licensing and licensing organizations, fair use, and the public domain. It will also point to other concerns that participants may need to explore further for their own creative goals. This workshop is intended for informational purposes only and should not be considered as legal advice.

Copyright, Fair Use, and Instruction

Link to slides

Former Faculty: Rachel King, Online Services and Scholarly Communications Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will understand the ways in which copyright and fair use are related to instruction.
  • Participants will apply a fair use analysis to classroom situations in face to face and online situations.
  • Participants will implement strategies for using classroom materials in an ethical manner.

This workshop will introduce teaching faculty to the ways that copyright specifically affects classroom and online instruction. The focus will be on the rights and limitations of the fair use doctrine, which allows the use of copyright-protected works in certain circumstances, including considerations of educational purposes. The workshop will introduce the traditional four factors of a fair use analysis, and participants will practice using this analysis in a variety of situations. The workshop is intended for informational purposes only and is not legal advice.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Demystifying Journal Selection and Scholarly Publishing for Medical Researchers

Link to presentation

Former Faculty:

  • Rachel King, Online Services & Scholarly Communications Librarian, Cooper Medical of Rowan University

Learning objectives: 

  • Evaluate a journal's reputation and impact

  • Identify opportunities and funding resources for those wanting to publish their work in open access venues.

  • Avoid predatory journals.

There are many factors for researchers in the biomedical sciences to consider when choosing a journal for their research. Prestige and impact have always been key, but now there are additional factors—for example, the ability to make work open access (OA). OA publication means that the article is free to all readers, potentially amplifying the article's influence and reach. But how does one find reputable publications? And what about the steep fees (called APCs or article processing charges) that are often required to make work free to readers? This workshop, designed for medical researchers—in particular, students and faculty at Rowan's medical campuses—will give attendees a clearer understanding of the academic publishing landscape. Topics covered will include: the nuances of OA publishing, appraising journal impact and reputation, learning more about potential OA funding opportunities (including those provided by Rowan University Libraries), and avoiding predatory publishers. Whether you are a first-time or seasoned author you will walk away with the information you need to find the most appropriate venues for your work.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience 

Software requirements: None

Inclusive Citation Practices

Faculty: Andrea Baer, Public Services Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Reflect on the value of seeking a diversity of perspectives and voices when researching a topic, as well as barriers to locating a diversity of voices and perspectives in scholarly conversations. 

  • Identify ways that citations influence conversations about a given topic, including what perspectives and voices are included or excluded.

  • Identify and apply strategies for diversifying the perspectives and voices reflected in your citations.

Research and scholarship are sometimes described as conversations: people with varying kinds of knowledge and expertise on a topic and different perspectives on it ideally come together to share and further strengthen their individual and shared understandings. But having open and inclusive conversations is often tricky. Who is present in the conversation, who is absent, and how are people’s voices heard, muted, or amplified? How do people enter into the conversation, and what barriers stand in the way?

These questions point to the reality that scholarly conversations, like all conversations, are greatly influenced by the social structures and systems in which individuals and groups exist and interact, and which often advantage some while disadvantaging others. Inclusive citation practices, through which individuals seek out and engage with sources that reflect a diversity of voices and perspectives on a topic, can help to create more inclusive academic research and conversations. Participants in this workshop will explore the value of inclusive citation, as well as develop practical skills for inclusive citation.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience 

Software requirements: None

Information Privilege, Paywalls, and the Cost of Research

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives: 

  • Explore how information privilege permeates all aspects of research.
  • Learn about the problems in sharing academic research and how it relates to information privilege.
  • Reflect and learn how the Rowan community supports scholarly researchers including faculty, staff and students. 

Since the creation of the internet, online information and scholarly research have been made easily accessible with a simple click of a mouse. Or have they?  In this workshop issues of information privilege, paywalls and the cost of research will be explored.  This workshop will help all Rowan scholars learn how they can get the support they need and to learn more about the information ecosystem that influences how information is created and shared. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software Requirements: None

Open Access Publishing at Rowan University

Faculty: Ben Saracco, Reference and Research Librarian, Cooper Medical of Rowan University 

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand challenges of current scholarly communication system.
  • Learn about different pathways to open access.
  • Learn about Rowan University Libraries (RUL) publishing agreements that allow Rowan authors to publish open access with no Article Processing Charges (APCs).

Scholarly publishing is an important part of a faculty member’s academic and scholarly lifecycle. With the rise of digital and open access publishing, however, it is important to have an understanding of open access especially in the context of the changing scholarly communication system. In this workshop, attendees will learn the current challenges in the scholarly communication system, understand the different pathways to open access and learn about the open access publishing opportunities that Rowan University Libraries has made available to Rowan authors via publisher agreements.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Open Licensing: Introduction to Creative Commons Licenses

Link to slides 

Former Faculty: Shilpa Rele, Scholarly Communication and Data Curation Librarian, Bret McCandless, Music and Performing Arts Librarian Faculty: Christine Davidian, Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian.

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will understand the rights and limitations of the six different creative commons licenses.
  2. Participants will be able to apply creative commons licenses to created works.
  3. Participants will be able to find and adapt works with creative commons licenses.

Description:

This workshop will introduce participants to creative commons licenses, which allow more freedom than traditional copyright for access, distribution, and re-use. Creative Commons licenses give everyone from individual creators to large institutions a standardized way to grant the public permission to use their creative work under copyright law. They also ensure that licensors get credit for the work they deserve. This workshop will be useful for creators (anyone in the Rowan community) who want to make their work more accessible and for creators who want to reuse and adapt existing materials in their work.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Preparing and Complying with the New NIH Data Management and Sharing (DMS) Policy

Link to slides

Faculty: Marlowe Bogino, Clinical and Reference Librarian

Learning objectives:

  • Understand what the purpose and aspects of the NIH (National Institutes of Health) data policy are
  • Learn key elements provided within the NIH policy.
  • Learn about tools  and Resources to assist with how to prepare and submit a data management plan to NIH.
  • Learn what resources and Rowan libraries resource/ services that are available to assist with data management.

The 2003 NIH Data Sharing Policy has been revised, and the new policy goes into effect on January 25, 2023. In January 2023, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) will begin requiring researchers who obtain funds from them to include a data-management plan in their grant applications and to eventually make their data publicly available.

This workshop is geared to those participating in NIH-funded research and those who simply are interested in learning more about this policy, which the NIH believes will accelerate research and discovery by increasing accessibility to data. This workshop will provide information on the policy and will highlight important features of it. Attendees will come away with a list of resources and tools to assist with understanding how to best comply with this new policy, as well as knowledge about Rowan library-specific tools and services that are available to assist with data management. This workshop is open to all students, researchers, medical students, clinicians, and staff members.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Treasures from Rowan University Archives and Special Collections

Link to slides

Faculty: Sara Borden, CA, Head of Archival Collections and Services

Learning objectives:

  • Learn what primary sources are in a university archives and special collections;
  • Examine and learn details from historic Rowan University artifacts such as: maps; incunabula and rare books; one-of-a-kind manuscripts detailing southern New Jersey history; and other incredible treasures from the region, the nation, and the world held in the collections;
  • Understand that archives contain materials that are not only useful for work in humanities and social sciences but archives hold documents and objects of interest to those in STEM studies as well as other fields.

This workshop will clear up common misconceptions about archives (they're dusty! they're only for historians!), while examining and highlighting the truly exceptional and remarkable documents, manuscripts, objects, and other ephemera that can be found in Rowan University Archives and Special Collections (UASC). Attendees will see digitized images of the treasures in UASC and will have an improved sense of UASC holdings and what is necessary to do research within them. There will also be time for comments Q&A.

Where Should I Publish? Using Case Studies to Guide Decision Making

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning Objectives:

  • Using case studies to help determine where to publish a manuscript. 
  • To understand and think about issues that go into the manuscript selection process for publication. 

Deciding where to publish a manuscript can be fraught with obstacles and many uncertainties. Difficulties in publishing include: deciphering open access availability, data management challenges, and navigating the explosion of predatory publishers. In this interactive workshop, Dan Kipnis the Life Sciences Librarian, will introduce various case studies using different academic personas including graduate student, tenure track faculty and an employee working industry to help walk through the issues to think about in selecting a journal for publication.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Teaching, Learning and Inquiry

Teaching News Literacy with the News Literacy Project

Faculty: Leslie Allison, PhD, Senior Lecturer in Writing Arts

Learning Objectives: 

  • Have a better understanding of what news literacy is and how it's relevant to your field

Do you find your students struggling to differentiate between formal journalism, peer reviewed sources, and random digital content? Do your students seem unsure about how to find credible news sources related to their field of study? Come learn how the nonprofit organization, The News Literacy Project, can enhance your teaching, no matter your discipline. A demonstration of the News Literacy Project's “Checkology” classroom will be provided, featuring interchangeable videos, activities, and quizzes designed to build student skills in combating misinformation and identifying credible sources. This workshop is for instructors teaching writing intensive classes or those that involve sustained source-based research projects.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Teaching through the Lens of “Decoding the Disciplines”: An Introduction and Cross-Disciplinary Conversation

Faculty: Andrea Baer, Public Services Librarian and Assistant Professor in the Library

Learning Objectives: 

  • Become familiar with the Decoding the Disciplines (DtD) model for instruction planning.
  • Engage with reflective questions about scholarly and knowledge creation in your discipline that are intended to help unearth tacit disciplinary knowledge and practices.
  • Reflect on ways the potential for DtD to support teaching and learning. 

Decoding the Disciplines (DtD) is an approach to instructional design that begins with identifying the places where students often get “stuck” in the learning process, and then considering if those “stuck places” (or “bottlenecks”) point to tacit knowledge, assumptions, and practices among experts in a field that are not understood outside of it (Middendorf and Pace, 2004). By “decoding” the tacit knowledge and mental moves that disciplinary experts bring to a specific problem or task, faculty engaged with DtD often use the model to better design learning experiences that provide modeling, opportunities for practice, and feedback, all of which are shaped to engage and motivate students.

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the Decoding the Disciplines model and will consider its potential to inform their own teaching. As part of this process, participants will engage with a series of reflective questions about scholarship and knowledge creation within their disciplines. These questions, inspired by DtD and the Association of College & Research Libraries' (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, are adapted from librarian Sara D. Miller’s faculty development work with Decoding the Disciplines. Through both individual reflection and dialogue with faculty from different disciplines, participants will consider if/how their responses to these questions unearth tacit disciplinary knowledge, assumptions, and practices that might be made explicit in their teaching. Participants will finally consider implications for their teaching that are illuminated through their engagement with Decoding the Disciplines and cross-disciplinary conversations.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Past Workshops