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Rowan Library Workshops

Spring 2021: Rowan Library Workshops

Spring 2021 Workshop: Overview and Registration

All Rowan University Libraries workshops are free and open to students, staff and faculty. Use the Register link next to the relevant workshop to reserve your spot.

Workshops are available in 4 tracks: 

  1. Digital Research Tools
  2. Evaluating Information and Online Habits in the Digital Age
  3. Scholarly Communication 
  4. Citation Management

Full descriptions of each workshop are available below or from the navigation menu.

Please note: If a date and time do not work for you contact the faculty member to arrange another time either for a workshop or a one-on-one consultation

All workshops will be virtual.  
Presenters will confirm directly with registrants prior to workshop on which desired presentation platform will be used.

Questions? Contact Dan Kipnis, kipnisd@rowan.edu

Digital Research Tools

Library 101

Dates:

  • Tuesday, February 2nd, 11am-12pm. Register
  • Thursday, February 4th, 3-4pm. Register

Length of workshop: 60 minutes

Faculty: Bret McCandless, Performing Arts Librarian

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will navigate the library website to discover various services that the library and librarians offer.
  2. Participants will strategically search and filter for resources using Library Search.
  3. Participants will be able to access library resources through Library Search, databases, link resolvers, and interlibrary loan.

Description:

This workshop is designed as an introduction or refresher to Rowan University library services, particularly new faculty and transfer students. Topics covered will include using Library Search, online resources, research guides, and interlibrary loan. There will also be time reserved for questions and answers on general library services.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Search Google Scholar Like a Pro

Dates: 

Length of workshop: 45 minutes

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives: 

  1. Attendees will set-up preferences in searching Google Scholar
  2. Attendees will learn advanced search tips for creating focused search strategies in Google Scholar 

Description:

Google Scholar has rapidly become a starting point for research. Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian, will introduce search tips and tricks for searching Google Scholar. Rather than getting millions of results, learn techniques to focus your searches. In 30 minutes attendees will become power searchers and learn the tricks the expert searchers use to improve their results. The last 15 minutes will be dedicated for questions and practice. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software Requirements:  None

No More Lost Files: Take Control of Your Digital Life

Dates:

  • Friday, March 12th, 10-11am. Register
  • Wednesday, March 31st, 2-3pm. Register 

Length of workshop: 60 minutes

Faculty: Rachel King, Online Services and Scholarly Communications Librarian, CMSRU

Learning objectives: 

  1. Learn best practices for effectively storing and organizing documents in a variety of file formats.

Description:

If you've ever had a corrupted computer file, a damaged smartphone, or a stolen laptop, you know how easily it is to lose important digital data. Backing up all your files isn't hard, but according to estimates, one third of us never do it, and many of the rest of us are only partially protected. To celebrate World Backup Day (March 31st), we invite members of the Rowan community to join a virtual workshop on becoming your own digital archivist. Through a combination of lecture and hands-on exercises, we'll cover tips for naming files, choosing file formats, and storing data for long-term access. At the end of the workshop, participants will feel confident in their ability to preserve their personal and professional digital data. Never lose another article draft, slide presentation, or treasured photograph again!

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Without Geography, You're Nowhere: History and Application of GIS

Dates:

Length of workshop: 90 minutes

Faculty: Dr. Ashley York, Department of Geography, Planning and Sustainability 

Learning objectives: 

  1. Know the history and basic terminology of the field of GIS.
  2. Be able to interpret and assess the quality of maps produced by a GIS.
  3. Understand the process of displaying basic spatial data in a GIS software program.

Description:

Many of us use GIS, or Geographic Information Systems, in our everyday lives without even knowing it: when was the last time you used Google maps to get to a desired destination? Google is using spatial information about distance, speed limits, and traffic, in order to perform calculations that, ultimately, direct you to your destination along the fastest path. In general, GIS is a framework for gathering, organizing, and analyzing spatial data. By arranging spatial information into coincident layers, GIS software can help reveal deeper insights into patterns and relationships – not only where occurrences and processes of interest are happening, but also why. By visualizing data though maps, GIS users can make smarter decisions. For example, maps and GIS analyses provided vital information for tracking the progressive spread of the COVID-19 pandemic across the Earth. However, maps can also be manipulated through the users’ choice of symbology and classification methods in order to (dis)advantage particular groups of people. In this workshop, participants will learn the history and basic terminology of the GIS field, be able to interpret examples of “good” and “bad” maps produced by GIS, and have an understanding of how to display basic spatial data in a GIS.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Conducting Systematic Reviews in the Health Sciences

Dates:

Length of workshop: 90 minutes

Faculty: Amanda Adams, Reference & Instruction Librarian and Ben Saracco, Research & Digital Services Librarian at Cooper Medical of Rowan University 

Learning objectives:

  1. Conduct systematic reviews in health sciences.

Description:

This workshop will instruct participants on the steps involved and the planning process for systematic reviews, including faculty, librarian, and student roles. Systematic reviews identify, appraise, and synthesize all available evidence on a specific research question. A protocol is used to determine what will be included, and follow specific standards to reduce bias. Health sciences faculty may be interested including psychology, nursing, sports medicine, and other disciplines. The goal is to encourage more systematic review studies and collaboration with students and librarians.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Evaluating Information & Online Habits in the Digital Age

Evaluating Online Sources: An Introduction to "Lateral Reading"

Date: Wednesday, February 3rd, 2-3pm. Register

Length of workshop: 1 hour

Faculty: Andrea Baer, History and Political Science Librarian & Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives:

  1. Attendees will be introduced to lateral reading strategies for source evaluation, including SIFT and the Four Moves.
  2. Attendees will evaluate sources using SIFT and the Four Moves. 

Description:

Critical evaluation of online sources has become a necessary and required skill in academia, as well as in everyday use of the internet.  With the explosion of fake news, pseudoscience, and deep fake videos, how can researchers determine if a source is legitimate? While in some cases it’s fairly obvious that a source is suspect, at other times this isn’t so straightforward. Recent research indicates that both university professors and college students have difficulty recognizing misleading online sources that at first glance look reputable. The close reading skills that are key to academic work differ from the evaluation strategies needed when quickly determining whether an online source is trustworthy enough to be worth a closer look.  

In this 1-hour workshop, librarians Andrea Baer and Dan Kipnis will introduce “lateral reading” strategies that involve quickly moving off of a webpage and learning more about a source from other online information. This workshop is informed by the work of Mike Caulfield and of the Stanford History Education Group. (For a quick overview of these strategies see libguides.rowan.edu/EvaluatingOnlineSources.)  

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Google Is Neutral?: Unpacking Algorithmic Bias in Search Systems

Date: Friday, March 5th, 1-2pm. Register

Length of workshop: 60 minutes

Faculty: Andrea Baer, History and Political Science Librarian

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify scenarios in which algorithmic bias may influence search results in a given online environment.
  2. Identify and apply simple strategies for recognizing and counteracting the negative effects of algorithmic bias. 

Description:

People often think of technology and search engines like Google as neutral and unbiased. But search engine algorithms and other technologies frequently reflect larger societal biases. Google and other search engines also rank search results based partly on ad revenue that benefits them, rather than prioritizing source relevance or credibility.   

There are a good number of people who are working actively to minimize and counteract the negative effects of bias in search systems. But this bias is still prevalent. One thing you can do immediately is to increase your awareness of these biases and to develop search and evaluation strategies that work to question those biases. In this workshop you’ve become familiar with where “algorithmic bias” might show up and strengthen your abilities to counteract it.

Related research guide: https://libguides.rowan.edu/search_system_bias 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

"Debunking" Misinformation: Challenges and Strategies

Date: Friday, February 5th, 12-1pm. Register

Length of workshop: 60 minutes

Faculty: Andrea Baer, History and Political Science Librarian

Learning objectives:

  1. Recognize the challenges of “debunking” misinformation. 
  2. Recognize the role that confirmation bias plays in how people look for and respond to information that reinforces or challenges their views. 
  3. Identify and apply effective strategies for “debunking” misinformation. 

Description:

The spread of misinformation has always been a problem, but the Internet, social media, and other digital technologies have intensified the speed and ease at which misinformation spreads. The often reactive nature of our brains and of our personal biases also play a role, especially given increased political polarization in the U.S. and beyond. Once misinformation has spread, correcting it isn’t as simply as merely telling people that information is inaccurate. People tend to continue believing the false information despite the correction. This is especially true when the misinformation reinforces a person's pre-existing beliefs. 

But there are useful ways to counter misinformation! In this workshop you’ll be introduced to effective “debunking” strategies and on related research on the relationship between our brains, beliefs, and the spread of misinformation. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Digital Wellness: Exploring Our Everyday Relationships with Technologies, Communities, and Ourselves

Date: Friday, February 19th, 11am-12:15pm. Register

Length of workshop: 75 minutes

Faculty: Andrea Baer, History and Political Science Librarian

Learning objectives: 

  1. Reflect on the ways that digital technologies positively and negatively affect your well being.
  2. Explore examples in which digital wellness plays a role for individuals and for society as a whole.
  3. Identify your own digital wellness priorities and related actions you can take to better support your digital wellness. 

Description:

In this time of pandemic and social distancing, we have become even more reliant on digital technologies and platforms to complete everyday tasks and to meet many of our most basic social, emotional, intellectual, and physical needs. At the same time that digital technologies help us to connect with others and to engage in personally, professionally, and socially meaningful activities, digital platforms can also be sources of stress that divide our attention, negatively affect our physical health, and pose privacy concerns. 

In this interactive workshop participants will reflect on the role that digital technologies play in their everyday lives and on the positive and negative effects that their relationships to these technologies have on them as individuals and on the various communities to which they belong. Participants will explore various case studies in which digital wellness plays a role and will be invited, but not required, to share about their own experiences with and perspectives on digital wellness. Throughout the session participants will consider their digital wellness priorities and related actions they can take to better support digital wellness in their own lives and in their communities. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: Computer recommended but not required.

Scholarly Communication

Build Your Researcher Profile with ORCID

Dates:

  •  Tuesday, February 16th, 10-11am. Register
  • Wednesday, April 7th, 11am-12pm. Register

Length of workshop: 60 minutes

Faculty: Shilpa Rele, Scholarly Communication and Data Curation Librarian and Ben Saracco, Reference and Research Librarian at Cooper Medical of Rowan University 

Learning objectives: 

  1. Attendees will learn about ORCID.
  2. Attendees will learn about benefits of having an ORCID to researchers.
  3. Attendees will gain understanding of how ORCIDs fit into the research workflow.

Description:

ORCIDs (Open Researcher and Contributor IDentifiers) are useful to all who participate in research, scholarship, and innovation. An ORCID helps to uniquely identify and connect researchers to their contributions and affiliations across time, disciplines, and borders. In this workshop, attendees will learn more about ORCIDs, their benefits and their significance in the research workflow. There will also be time during the workshop to create ORCIDs if an attendee does not have one. This workshop is open to Rowan faculty, students and staff.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Write Your Effective Data Management Plans (DMP) with DMP Tool!

Dates: 

  • Thursday, March 18th, 2-3pm. Register
  • Wednesday, April 14th, 11am-12pm. Register

Length of workshop: 60 minutes

Faculty: Shilpa Rele, Scholarly Communication and Data Curation Librarian and Ben Saracco, Reference and Research Librarian at Cooper Medical of Rowan University

Learning objectives:

  1. Attendees will gain an understanding of what DMPTool is.
  2. Attendees will learn about benefits of using it.
  3. Attendees will learn how to use it.

Description:

External funding agencies are increasingly requiring researchers to write effective Data Management Plans (DMPs) as part of their grant proposals. DMPs include information on how researchers plan to manage, store and preserve research data to meet funding agency requirements for their grant award. DMPTool is a free tool developed by the California Digital Library and provides guidance from specific funders who require DMPs. This workshop will guide researchers through the process of creating an account, using the tool individually or with internal/external collaborators and using locally developed guidance to include in DMPs. This workshop is open to Rowan faculty, students and staff.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Assessing Credibility of Open Access Journals for Scholarly Publishing

Date: Thursday, March 11th, 11am-12:15pm. Register

Length of workshop: 75 minutes

Faculty: Shilpa Rele, Scholarly Communication and Data Curation Librarian & Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn the importance of open access publishing.
  2. Learn some strategies for identifying (top) journals for publication.
  3. Learn about what to look for in identifying and avoiding predatory publishers.
  4. Be introduced to resources to help with evaluating open access journals.

Description: 

Scholarly publishing is an important part of a faculty member’s academic and scholarly life cycle. With the rise of digital publishing, however, it is important to have the tools and awareness to identify quality journals to publish in. In this workshop, attendees will learn what to look for in identifying and avoiding predatory publishers and will be introduced to resources to help with evaluating open access journals. The workshop includes a hands-on activity where attendees will evaluate an online journal for its quality and credibility by applying criteria learned during the workshop and using some tools that the Rowan University Libraries licenses.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Creative Commons Licenses: An Overview

Dates:

Length of workshop: 60 minutes

Faculty: Shilpa Rele, Scholarly Communication and Data Curation Librarian, Bret McCandless, Music and Performing Arts Librarian and Christine Davidian, Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian.

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will understand the rights and limitations of the six different creative commons licenses.
  2. Participants will be able to apply creative commons licenses to created works.
  3. Participants will be able to find and adapt works with creative commons licenses.

Description:

This workshop will introduce participants to creative commons licenses, which allow more freedom than traditional copyright for access, distribution, and re-use. Creative Commons licenses give everyone from individual creators to large institutions a standardized way to grant the public permission to use their creative work under copyright law. They also ensure that licensors get credit for the work they deserve. This workshop will be useful for creators (anyone in the Rowan community) who want to make their work more accessible and for creators who want to reuse and adapt existing materials in their work.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Copyright 101

Dates:

  • Wednesday, February 24th, 11am-12:15pm. Register 
  • Tuesday, March 23rd, 3pm-4:15pm. Register

Length of workshop: 75 mins

Faculty: Shilpa Rele, Scholarly Communication and Data Curation Librarian and Bret McCandless, Music and Performing Arts Librarian

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will understand the basics of copyright considerations and their role in higher education.
  2. Participants will understand the role the library plays in managing copyright concerns for access to copyrighted materials.
  3. Participants will understand the basics of Fair Use and its application in using licensed or copyrighted materials/e-resources for teaching, learning, and scholarship.

Description: 

This workshop will introduce participants to the basics of copyright. The focus will be on understanding the basics of copyright for creators and users. We will explore the role of the library in managing use of print materials and licensed electronic resources. The workshop will also briefly introduce participants to key issues related to fair use for teaching, learning and scholarship. A deeper dive will be available in the Fair Use and Instruction workshop. It is intended for informational purposes only and is not legal advice. This workshop is intended for faculty and graduate students. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: None

Fair Use and Instruction

Dates:

Length of workshop: 60  mins

Faculty: Shilpa Rele, Scholarly Communication and Data Curation Librarian and Bret McCandless, Music and Performing Arts Librarian

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will understand the ways in which copyright and fair use related to instruction.
  2. Participants will apply a fair use analysis to classroom situations in face to face and online situations.
  3. Participants will implement strategies for using classroom materials in an ethical manner.

Description:

This workshop will introduce teaching faculty to the ways that copyright specifically affects classroom and online instruction. The focus will be on the rights and limitations of the fair use doctrine, which allows the use of copyright-protected works in certain circumstances, including considerations of educational purposes. The workshop will introduce the traditional four factors of a fair use analysis, and participants will practice using this analysis in a variety of situations.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

Affordable Textbook Alternatives

Date: Friday, April 9th, 10-11am. Register

Length of workshop: 45-60 minutes

Faculty: Sam Kennedy, Information Literacy Librarian, and Ashley Lierman, Instruction & Education Librarian

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to articulate the value of replacing course textbooks with alternatives that are affordable for students.
  2. Participants will be able to select methods and strategies for changing course materials to affordable alternatives.
  3. Participants will be able to use library and open web resources to help them find and implement pre-made affordable materials.

Description:

Educational costs are more of a challenge than ever in our current remote learning situation, where used textbooks are more difficult to acquire and other economic circumstances may be creating difficulties for students. This workshop will assist teaching faculty who want to alleviate their students' burdens by replacing costly course textbooks with high-quality alternatives that are free or low-cost to students. We will discuss the benefits of using affordable and accessible materials even beyond saving students money, and bust some common myths about alternatives to traditional textbooks. We will also provide practical strategies for multiple methods of implementing alternatives, with realistic estimations of the time and effort required for each, and demonstrate how to find and evaluate pre-existing materials using library resources and on the open web. Please join us to learn how you can help your students be less stressed and more engaged with your teaching, as soon as next semester!

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Software requirements: None

TAP Grant Workshops

Dates:

  • Wednesday, January 20, 12pm
  • Friday, March 5th, 10am

Registration: Email novak@rowan.edu to RSVP or for more information.

Description: This workshop is for TAP applicants interested in learning more about free or low-cost textbook alternatives. We will discuss the benefits of using affordable and accessible materials even beyond saving students money, and bust some common myths about alternatives to traditional textbooks. We will also provide practical strategies for multiple methods of implementing alternatives, with realistic estimations of the time and effort required for each, and demonstrate how to find and evaluate pre-existing materials using library resources and on the open web. If you provide the subject area you are looking to choose or make an alternative for, we can provide targeted resources for your project. Please join us for ideas to get started with replacing the textbook for your course!

Citation Management Software

Citation Management Software

Citation management software is designed to help researchers organize their research and to generate bibliographies and format their manuscripts according to a desired manuscript output style.

Introduction to Zotero Citation Manager

Dates:

Time: 60 minutes

Faculty: Bret McCandless, Performing Arts Librarian

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will import citations into Zotero manually and automatically.
  2. Participants will incorporate Zotero into Microsoft Word and Google Docs and generate automatic citations and bibliographies.

Description: 

Citation management software can help you keep track of the sources that you use in your research, but can also help streamline the writing and editing process. Come learn the tricks of open-source Zotero, and create citations and reference lists with ease, saving you valuable time.

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience

Software requirements: Recommended that participants download Zotero before attending the workshop: https://www.zotero.org/

Introduction to RefWorks Citation Manager

Dates:

Length of workshop: 60 minutes

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian

Learning objectives: 

  1. Attendees will create folders and organize their research.
  2. Attendees will learn to import research into their RefWorks account using Save to RefWorks button and export functionality from various databases.
  3. Attendees will learn to format their bibliographies in Google docs.

Description:

Frustrated with organizing your research and typing out bibliographies by hand?  Do you have your PDFs stored in various places and wish they were all in one place and searchable?  
Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian, will introduce RefWorks, an online bibliographic management software program that will help you organize your research and format bibliographies in just a few clicks.  With over 3,000 bibliographic output styles and exceptional customer support, RefWorks will help any Rowan student, staff or faculty conducting research save time and get organized. 

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience. 

Software Requirements: RefWorks add-on to Google drive.  Instructions will be sent prior to workshop.

Introduction to EndNote

Dates:

Length of workshop: 60 minutes

Faculty: Dan Kipnis, Life Sciences Librarian 

Learning objectives: 

  1. Attendees will learn how to import citations into Endnote.
  2. Attendees will learn how to format a bibliography in Word using Endnote.

Description:

Endnote is a software tool for publishing and managing bibliographies, citations and references. Rowan University offers a free license to EndNote available to students, staff and faculty. This is an introductory workshop that will demonstrate how to import citations from various databases and search engines. In addition, formatting bibliographies in Word will be demonstrated.  

Skill levels for attendees: Little to no experience, Some experience

Upgrade your Grade

Plan Your Semester

Tue, Feb. 9, 12 pm
Learn about the best academic services on-campus and when to use them.

Long Night Against Procrastination

Tue, Mar 16  6:30 - 8:30 pm
Fight procrastination and get help on any type of assignment - essays, lab reports, or research papers.  Tutors and research librarians will be available to help you work.

Prep for Finals

Tue, Apr 13, 12 pm
Get the support you need to ace your finals.

Archive of Workshop slides

Past Rowan University Workshops

Past Workshops

Past Workshops